Ringworm


Ringworm is a fungal infection that are on the skin. Some of these fungal infections produce round spots on the skin, but many do not. The medical term for ringworm is tinea. Medical doctors will add another word to indicate where the fungus is located. Dermatophytes are the fungi causing ringworm hence also known as dermatophytosis. It appears in various forms of cutaneous infection. The names are given according to the site affected. The degree of inflammation depends on the causative fungus and host immunity. It may transmit from soil, animal or from human to human.


Skin fungus is very common. They only live on the dead layer of keratin protein on top of the skin. They rarely go deeper into the body and can't live on mucous membranes, such as those in the mouth or vagina
Some fungi live only on human skin, hair or nails. Others live on animals and only sometimes are found on human skin. Still others live in the soil. Heat and moisture help fungi grow and thrive, which makes them more commonly found in skin folds such as those in the groin or between the toes. T
Types of Ringworm
• Tinea barbae: ringworm of the bearded area of the face and neck, with swelling and marked crusting, often with itching, sometimes causes the hair to break off. "Barber's itch".
• Tinea capitis: ringworm of the scalp commonly affects children, mostly in late childhood or adolescence. This condition may spread in schools. Tinea capitis appears as scalp scaling that is associated with bald spots.
• Tinea corporis: ringworm the skin of the body, it often produces the round spots of classic ringworm. Sometimes, these spots have an "active" outer border as they slowly grow and advance.
• Tinea cruris: ringworm of the groin or "Jock Itch" tends to have a reddish-brown color and to extend from the folds of the groin down onto one or both thighs.
• Tinea faciei: ringworm on the face except in the area of the beard. On the face, ringworm is rarely ring-shaped. Causes red, scaly patches with indistinct edges.
• Tinea manus: ringworm involving the hands, particularly the palms and the spaces between the fingers. Causes thickening (hyperkeratosis) of these areas, often on only one hand.
• Tinea pedis: ringworm called "Athlete's Foot" may cause scaling and inflammation in the toe webs, especially the one between the fourth and fifth toes. Thickening or scaling of the skin on the heels and soles. Causes blisters between the toes or on the sole. Extremely common skin disorder. It is the most common and perhaps the most persistent of the fungal (tinea) infections. It is rare before adolescence. Can occur in association with other fungal skin infections such as tinea cruris
• Tinea unguium: ringworm of the fingernails and, more often, the toenails yellow, thick, and crumbly. This is referred to as fungal nails or onychomycosis
 

• Reddish, scaly or white patches on the skin
• The lesions may appear raised and blistered.
• The circular lesion might have a clearing in the center.
• Hair loss is common side effect of this disease.
• Ringworm of scalp especially is characterized by patchy hair loss where the hair might be bent and broken at an odd angle.

  • Keep the affected areas clean and sweat-free
  • Drink plenty of water 
  • Use coconut oil in drier areas like between the toes and groins 
  • Do not repeat the same clothes worn a day before
  • Do not wear somebody else's clothes 
  • Maintain good personal hygeine
  • Avoid staying in damp and marshy areas for long

Lycopodium , Kalium Bichromicum ,Arsenicum album, Bacillinum ,Calcarea carbonica,Cicuta, Graphites,Kali bich, Nitric acid, Natrum Mur are effective homeopathic remedies to cure ringworm

  • Clinical Examination
  • Skin Biopsy
Not Available


web
counter